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to affect business and the economy in the united states and what it all means for your money melissa: straight to our top story tonight, the city of boston, massachusetts, is still reeling following yesterday's horrific bombing near the finish line of the boston marathon. president obama speaking out today on the tragedy, calling the attack, an act of terrorism. now with the latest news out of boston is fox news's craig boswell. >> the bombs detonated at the boston marathon used six liter pressure cookers packed with shards of metal, nail and ball bearings. they were place inside a black duffel bag and set on the ground. >> we had an attack. >> doctors removed sharp objects from lower extremities of victims. >> many have wound mostly in the lower part of their body, wound rated to the place effect of the bomb as well as small metallic fragments. >> the two bombs exploded about 12 seconds apart. the first near the finish line where 8-year-old martin richard was there to cheer on his father. the little boy was killed in the blast. when he ran back to his mother,wo siblings. bill richar
insight on the global economy, as well as the impact of new security concerns in light of the tragic and deadly bombings in boston. >> yeah, it was of course, at this hour when we first learned yesterday of the horrific events unfolding in boston. that is where our scott cohn is right now with the very latest. scott, one day later, what can you tell us? >> reporter: maria, 24 hours after the horrific attacks, it is still an intense crime scene behind me, as authorities try to search for any clues about who did this and why. u.s. attorney general eric holder out with a statement a short time ago, again, calling on the public to help, saying no bit of evidence is too small. they are looking for cell phone video, anything that can help them figure out and piece the facts together. we also know that the boston athletic association, which stages this marathon every year, had three surveillance cameras at the finish line. the company that provided those cameras under a sponsorship agreement tells cnbc they are cooperating with authorities. we will see whether that yields anything, but what
to securing our borders, just starting our economy, and ensuring for access to that great american dream. the current status quo on immigration makes no sense. we turn away people from entering the country who could create thousands of jobs and let in people crossing our borders who take away jobs. our approach is balanced. the border security triggers are strong, but achievable. the path to citizenship is tough, but it is accessible. yes, our bill does secure the border first, but it treats the situation of those living in the shadows as an equally urgent priority. this is by design. we believe that americans will support sensible solutions to dealing with the undocumented and future legal immigrants, but only if they are convinced there will not be future waves of illegal immigrants. when the 11 million come out of the shadows and it will not only improve their lives and their families' lives, it will strengthen our country and its economies. in fact, conservative economist douglas holtz eakin has found that immigration reform will save taxpayers $2.7 trillion. we wanted this legislati
they will have going forward on our economy. dagen: peter barnes has much more on this. peter: we looked at research reports on the impact of attacks of 9/11 back in 2001. the current economy has shown some softness recently in job creation and retail sales. any hits to consumer confidence may make things worse. two economists that i have talked to this morning do not think it will get too bad. the 9/11 attacks were targeted for the financial systems. consumer confidence rose sharply after the 9/11 attacks. experiencing the biggest monthly drop in a decade. the attacks caused more than 400 mass layoffs and displaced 130,000 workers. industrial production fell back then. the unemployment rate jumped more than a half a percentage point. we were already in a recession that september. we are not in a recession today. boston is not an economic center. >> maybe a day or two people will be hesitant about going out shopping. assuming nothing else happens, it should last much longer. peter: it could take a short-term hit because of boston. they are more worried about the impact on the economy and
$100, and in september of 2011, copper price a reflection of the week call for the global economy, china news earlier this week, bearish, copper prices down 6%. if you're looking for gains, the agricultural sector saw some, and, and natural gas of 4 present. and someone you did the action in today's session. and $100 from the close of around $400 a troy ounce. and gold will average 1450 a troy ounce, in 2014. we also see reports of stronger jewelry demand, gold has come down significantly, some buyers stepping in at these levels and copper falling out of favor of this week on weaker reports out of china and also copper is down 6%. lots of volatility, wrapping up the week more muted reaction. melissa: let's check the markets and go to the stock exchange. lauren simonetti is standing by. >> the volatility sandra is talking about is the volatility we are seeing here on wall street. what a week. the dow can't seem to stay or get into the positive at this hour but the nasdaq and the s&p are higher, this has been the worst week of the year for all three major averages, the worst week si
, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but that doesn't mean that it can't happen. it can happen. if we aren't on our guard all the time
is typically bought as a safe haven. expectations of a recovery in the global economy have prompted investors to buy riskier assets such as stocks. the latest chinese economic data has triggered further selling of gold. >>> japanese finance minister aso says he will seek the understanding of his group of 20 counterparts and central bank chiefs for the country's economic policy. leaders of the g-20 industrialized and developing nations are getting together in washington later this week. japan's economic policy may be a subject of discussion. u.s. treasury officials last week called on japan not to deliberately devalue its currency. >> translator: japan's measures including those of the bank of japan are aimed at ending prolonged deflation. i will, again, clarify this at the g-20 meeting. so there is no misunderstanding about how true policy objectives. >>> japanese entrepreneurs have had the chance to hear how to be successful from some of the best in the i.t. business. global tech leaders have urged them to expand their businesses with an open mind. executives of japanese i.t. firms organized
and granger. that's a great tell of the real economy. boy, it's hard not to -- >> there's a lot going on regarding housing. we'll keep our eyes on the homebuilders. >> these people want to try to find a hole in the housing starts, good luck. this is a very big move and we're building far fewer homes than what are destroyed by fire and flood. a lot of people will live with their mother-in-laws. >> despite what we know about the price of building products, right? and the cost of contractors and electricians. >> and i think some of those costs again will come down. copper came down big, and aluminum bid. we'll take you to boston. we're expecting this to be the fbi in charge of the boston field office and deval patrick there and the u.s. attorney carmen ortiz. let's listen in. >> everyone, thank you for coming this morning. less than 24 hours after yesterday's act of terror we wanted to organize a briefing for you with the information that we have. the mayor is here, the members of our congressional delegation, all of the law enforcement leadership. we have several people who want to pres
.s. economy is headed south. lots of negative indicators recently, what do you say? >> i think that the u.s. economy is already in the south. if you will, and we don't show many signs of coming back, because of very bad policies coming out of washington. i mean, these things should be-- we should be lowering tax rates and broadening the tax base and controlling spending where it should be controlled and having free trade, minimal regulations, but we're going in the wrong direction, stuart. i think you're right. >> what about that question about everybody printing money? well, they are, we know that, but, i don't think it's working this time around. it's just not, you know, juicing the stock market like it used to. >> i don't think it used to so i agree with you totally. you can't push on a string and they have been trying to push on a string and if you look at it this is the single worst u.s. recovery in history and obviously, it's the largest single monetary expansion in history. and obviously, they don't work, they just don't work and he's grasping at straws and god knows what type of r
impact on how you look at the economy right now? are are you focused on other factors? >> at this point* i don't see them has any impact it is the actions going forward but it will not have an economic impact worries about people not wanting to go to a large sporting event and fortunately we have had these kinds of episodes before an economic impact has been negligent with so one of the event. but at this point* we did see an increase with the weekly consumer confidence numbers we get out from one survey. quite honestly it is said difficult and challenging period of time. i again, i step back but we are selling back into a realization it is a tough month for the economy. connell: to that point* to get away with the leading economic indicators came in looking at the dow and the generations the leading indicators declined does that tell you anything what was the message of that? >> of course, it doesn't tell us anything we don't know but it is amazing that shift in sentiment people have in the marketplace about the economy with the last four or eight weeks with the turn of the year and th
of our economy, that is online businesses that are selling to the nation where we have seen tremendous growth, that we owe it to the american people to have this go through regular order. and you know, i have heard the senate leader talk about regular order. i have heard the minority leader, senator mcconnell, talk about regular order, and here we are again not going through regular order. this should go to the finance committee. it should be thoroughly marked up in that committee. and i see senator hatch here. senator baucus and senator hatch both believe that this should go through the proper committee of jurisdiction so that we can address the concerns raised by so many about the bill and the way it is drafted. so with that, mr. president, i would urge my colleagues to vote against closure. this is not the right way to do business. this bill that has very important and negative implications on many businesses in this country and on a very important area of our economy should go through regular order to address concerns that have already been raised by many business groups, and so, m
, beat or miss estimates? as for the economy, here is today's calendar. >> how is the crowd sourcing experiment gone so far? i haven't looked at the results. >> the results for coming. >>? >> i can't even log in to the borrowing page. >> they've gotten some decent numbers that have come this. i think there are 1500 or 1700 -- >> but are they better -- >> they're good at it, but i think we have made the mistake of picking from predictable companies. that's why we started picking some trickier companies like apple. that's the one that's up in the air. nobody knows exactly what's going to happen. if you can beat on these companies, then we're going to be more impressed. >> apple generates a lot of attention and feedback. if i put out on twitter, will apple meet, beat or miss, some people will say it will meet, some will say it will miss and others will stay you stink, sullivan. >> but you will get responses by putting apple out there. >> anything you say on apple, and i'm an apple lifelong user, and i referenced a couple weeks ago that i was going to buy a windows 8 machine because it w
. that will be the biggest day for me because they're the big indicators of how the global economy is doing overall. speaking of the global economy, caterpillar if this was clearly a disappointment and the guidance was disappointment and they telegraphed it a little and the stock's been up and the dow this morning and the two things here, number one, he's coming on and talking about stability and that's the key word on our air on cnbc and a lot of people have noted the drop in mining. mining was down 25%. sales in the mining division, second most important was down 25%. i think a lot of people have got that already set up. remember, this is heavily shorted stock and it was $100 two months ago and it's $80 today and a lot of people anticipated what's going on. let me mention apple very quickly. the hope here is for a special dividend, increase the dividend to over a 3% yield and start with the big buyback. that's the big hope there. nobody's expecting them to blow the cover off of any of these numbers and all of them have been coming down. >> guys, back to you. >> watching microsoft continue to gain now up 4.
economy head of the fbi, all said on friday night, boston's back to normal. the public is no longer at recollection. they can't have it both ways. >> shepard: they're trying to. >> can't claim bostones back to normal and the public is not at risk and then say the guy is a risk. the purpose of the exception to the miranda rule is to protect police officers and those around the defendant at the time he is arrested. is that gun empty? y is the other gun? the other bomb? the type of excited utterrans someone would utter at the moment of arrest. it's not a way around the miranda ruling. the miranda ruling requires all government agencies to tell you before they ask you a question you don't have to answer it. the obama administration has taken a radical approach to the miranda rule by coming out of nowhere with this 48 hour rule that doesn't exist in any statute and no court has permitted it. >> going to regret it? >> i think they will. bass opposite they start using it there will be no stop to it. >> shepard: investigators want to talk with the wife of the older bombing suspect. are lawy
is a realization now that the market is probably well ahead of itself, based on what the economy is, based on what we're seeing happening around the world in china, certainly what's going on in europe. so the fact is that investors all of a sudden are deciding, geez, we better start paying attention to this news, becausing the market is well ahead of itself. so what you're seeing is the market backing off and really coming back or trying to come back to a state of equilibrium between where the economy is and where the market should be. the whole boston thing and boston marathon and that down in d.c. is certainly adding some angst to the market, but that's not the reason the market is off 170 points. part of it is much more technical just in terms of market action. >> but, michael, when we saw the market come off the lows, it happened to be when we thought there was an arrest. is that a coincidence with the markets? >> i think to some extent, there's going to be a little bit of a relief move if you see some kind of arrest really happen, but these deflationary pressures have been in play since the e
nearly 158 points while the nasdaq closed up 48. restored confidence in the world's number one economy sent asian stocks higher this morning. tokyo's nikkei rose 1%. hong kong's hang seng added a fraction. >>> more signs the housing market is recovering. builders started work on a million new homes in march. that hasn't happened since june 2008. and it was fueled by a surge in apartment building construction but single-family home construction fell by nearly 5%. >>> the international monetary fund now predicts global economy will grow by 3.3% this year. that's down two-tenths of a point since its january forecast. the imf says the u.s. economy will expand by a slightly smaller 1.9% while the eurozone economies were shrink slightly. back to you. >> and we understand car ownership and believe me we all know this here in san francisco but it comes with a big price tag, too, doesn't it? >> it sure does. a new report out by aaa found that owning an average sedan will drain about $9,100 a year from your wallet when you factor in gas, insurance and maintenance and tires and that cost is actu
: in a rapidly growing economy, daughters have become an increasing financial liability for their families says this sociologist. >> that don't want to pay dowries, they want to receive dowries. they want to give more education to the boys than to the girls because for them the boys are still more important. >> reporter: and the census shows indians are acting on that bias. for every 1,000 male infants born, there are just 914 females. in some regions, far fewer. in nature, those numbers are about equal. >> the gap began to wideen in the '90s with new ultrasound machines that made it easy to learn the fetus' sex. the scan led to the termination of millions of female pregnancies. in delhi, the center for social research has organized women into neighborhood groups trying to shift the ingrained gender bias, even invoking hinduism's goddess of prosperity. >> ( translated ): we must begin to welcome girl babies into our homes, like the goddess lack shi has come into our home. lack smi. >> reporter: they're also aware of the law that's become known by its english acronym. that's the pre-conception a
, and what we is not in the right step relating to where they think the economy is in relation to the equity markets, so we're a little cautious here. we think if we are above the 1561 to close is above, and interimmediate bull line, we'll be all right. liz: yesterday, we saw volatility in the wake of the marathon bombings jump 43%. that was a little destabilize due to a drop in gold, a precipitous drop yesterday, but, today, it is pulling back by 2 #%. there on the floor of the cme, what are traders talking about as it relates to what happened yesterday versus today in >> yesterday was unusual. before we came in, as you stated, it started with china, and the market was down for fears of growth in china. the boston bombing increased it. as we go on, hear more about what's going on, it's not looking like it's a coordinated attack, nothing to spread to the rest of the country. that's begin us time to di jeers everything and look at what we have to, and that's economic data that's going to drive what the market is ultimately. the other things have effects, no doubt, and they vie ma more in the
in setting up obamacare. why didn't they, john? it is their law. >> it is 1/6 of the economy and it has a lot of moving parts and frankly i think we reached the point where bureaucratic government, 20th century style can handle something this complex without proper price signals and proper market signals. the health care industry is a mess. half of it is paid are by the government. they set prices for the other half which is privately managed. i don't think it works, health savings accounts and health plans and extending people a lifeline if they get really seriously sick the we need to send market signals. right now this thing is a train wreck and there is nothing --. bill: that is your solution. what's theirs? >> their solution is we should trust them to make it work. and maybe after a few years it will work but right now everybody is confused. and of course the problem with these democrats foresee is the 2014 midterm elections are coming and if obamacare isn't perceived as working, people are going to say, i'm upset. i'm mad. remember, president obama promised americans, if you like your h
. al, what do you make of that? we were given that they were at least clawing back. >> the economy is never as good as people say it is. the housing market is never as good as people say it is, think of this, we have interests below 4%, f most to go out get a mortgage, housing market should be streaming back we're seeing a large percentage of sales dominated by visitors, there is still a foreclosure crisis going on, unemployment is still high we have not by any stretch of the imagination seeing what seem people call a recery. neil: we're well off the matt from lows. any trend or any improving trend looks good. when it is disrupted we feel bad. >> no, but i think that al's comment, ner as good as they say it is but never as bad, whole market has been en few fuego, have a tried to get a motorrage lately. -- mortgage lately. i tell you, they are not lending credit, and demand is not there for creditworthy borrows either, because people are not making more money, and businesses are not hiring. neil: tomorrow, you are jumping gun we talking about proctologists who offer mortgages. >> i
. also affected by the slowdown in china's economy and profit taking after weeks of gains. blue chips lost 265 points yesterday. the nasdaq was also down losing more than 2% of its value. >>> straight ahead, your tuesday morning weather. and security is stepped up at various events in the wake of the boston marathon bombing. boston marathon bombing. [ female announcer ] the only patch for the treatment of mild to moderate alzheimer's disease is exelon patch. now with more treatment options, exelon patch may improve overall function and cognition. your loved one can get a free 30-day trial. and you can have access to nurses. it does not change how the disease progresses. hospitalization, and rarely death, have been reported from wearing more than one patch at a time. the most common side effects are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fall, loss of appetite or weight, application site redness, and urinary tract infection. the likelihood and severity of these side effects may increase as the dose increases or if patients weigh less than 110 pounds. people at risk for stomach ulcers who take cer
discussion we dp, i understd how important refming our immigration system is to our economy and our national security. i cannot support immigration reform if we cannot be satisfied we have secured the border. getting that chicks were we can talk about how we are doing -- getting the metrics were we can talk how we are doing will be critical to getting my support and others. we look forward to working with you to come up with a definitive metrics. chairman of the transportation of security and subcommittee, i'm interested in the tsa budget. i will direct my questions in that direction. it seems logical as we are moving toward risk-based security with the tsa. the thing i have always supported. i support that. it seems to me we have moved theres security and should be significant costs saving for the taxpayer as he do risk-based screening and focus more on threat that ought to free up resources. we can look at the high-tech baggage screening. we would need a lesson screeners for baggage. software upgrades. the gun, we should be able to resource -- redo some of the workforce there. -- again, we
that people view as specific predictors of where the economy is going. and again, you can see while it did go down in august of 2012, we've essentially had six straight months of either flat or up and then we had a down. and, again, we would normally want to see something like three months of a trend before we made too much of this. but the fact is, that's not -- it's not a good news. so the question is, well, why is this happening? we've had -- first we've had soft spots in the economy for the last two or three springs. might be another one of those. but you have had the payroll tax increase go into effect. you've had sequestration go into effect. you have no growth in people's incomes. that was the more disappointing numbers out of the last unemployment insurance report. and if people don't have money, they can't spend money. and finally, we're being affected in the slowdown in europe in particular and the slowdown in the emerging markets. our export growth has fallen to about zero at the moment because there isn't demand overseas for our products. so it feels like a little bit of a soft sp
, union bank, and fidelity investments. >> this is what a personal economy looks like. as life changes, fidelity can help you readjust your investments along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college, and revisit your plan as retirement gets closer. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help fine-tune your personal economy. fidelity investments -- turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." "bbc world news america "reporting from washington. the white house says yesterday's bombing does not seem to be part of a broader plot. >> this was a heinous and cowardly act. given what we now know about what took place, the fbi is investigating it as an act of terrorism. >> but who did this and why is still a mystery. authorities are asking the public to hand in any photos or video recordings. amid ti
's an economy and you struggle hard to develop that if you can. but when you're in the theate if people are 40 or 50 feet away there's a lot you have to do with your voice. you have to be able to talk in a way he has a laugh line every night where he says "i'm not prejudice, i'd say that to a blank or a blank." the racial line. and that line should work if you start with "i'm not prejudice, harold." they've got to hear that. but there's always in the theater -- the heavy lifting is done by the actors in order to pull the audience where you want to go. >> rose: do you find that true? this is the first time you've been on broway. >> this is theirsttime i've be on broway. i've done theater in london but it is extraordinary how different so far the experience has been. >> rose: how so? >> well, because i think american audiences are so much more vociferous and kind of -- literally it feels like i imagine kind of elizabethan theater would have been like. >> rose: engaged? >> massively engaged. so responsive to minutia and -- and i think when i first thought this play -- and still now i took it -- i
is talking about a spring swoon for the economy. isn't spring a time for revival and resurrection. let's bring in our ace investor to get his forecast on the potential swoon. jeff klein, chief strategist, one of the best of the best. good to see you, jeff. why is it so gloomy all of a sudden? golly, this is not like last year. you a saw the housing numbers today, home sales off a tiny bit, but 11/12% price increases year on year, that's totally different from prior years. >> it is right, the housing situation is better. the auto sales are good. there are a lot of things in much better shape. but the market is all about expectations. the fact is economic data as solid as it has been lately has come in weaker than expectation, so have profits and importantly revenues lately. it's not that we see them falling off a cliff, if expectations got a little too high or rosy, it's funny, larry, as we looked at this year back at the end of last year, we laid out scenarios, a bulk case, down the middle base case, stocks have taken the bull path. bonds are kind of right in the middle. it's interesti
said, joe. she marked a total sea change in britain's relationship with the market economy before she came into power and anything that was considered important in the post-war british era was controlled by the state. nobody would do that today. she had a very permanent difference in the way britain see the mark of the economy and we are now a country which is the product of margaret thatcher's economic vision. >> steve rattner, i have been amused by commentary coming out of great britain one after another after another kr criticizing margaret thatcher on how she took on the unions and there is that line it had to be done. you were a "the new york times" reporter there. you have said the margaret thatcher is why great britain is great britain today and not italy or spain or greece. >> look. i agree. to me, it seems very clear that when she did was to save great britain from economic irrelevance and i think what may explain a little bit of the difference between the british view and the american view is that what she did was radical by british standards because britain had moved so clo
marathon runners and that has fostered culture and now, even a whole economy you wouldn't know existed unless you went looking. this is a runner named ambi burrfoot. he won the marathon in 1968. he was less than a mile from the finish yesterday when the explosions put there. it is hard to believe this attack targeted the marathon, but even if it was hit as a symbol of something else, it was hit in a way that mean it is world to a whole community of people who run. he wrote today in runners world, this wasn't just an attack against the marathon. it was our use of the streets. we have used our public roadways for annual parades, protest marchers, marathons and all over manner of events. the roads belong to us and their use represents a part of our free and democratic tradition. i trust and believe that will not change in the future. not in boston, not at the boston marathon and not in other important event. we cannot tent violent akts koent threaten our great institution, but our institutions did not become great by following a path of timidity and cowardess. we can only hope it will ris
it wasn't just to terrorize people in boston but to terrorize the american economy to terrorist investors and wall street, and the really good news, the thing to feel happy about today is it looks like the perpetrators of this act, if that was their intention, it failed because this was quite a bold rally we saw today. >> neil: you know, without getting too caught up in the weeds here, steve, though, a lot of them were running back to gold today. not in droves but that tends to be in case everything is hitting the fan, pick up some gold. so obviously the world on tender hooks. >> i think that jump up in the gold price is a little bit of fear factor. no question. gold is always the refuge of the people who are afraid with their money. but let's not forget that gold even with the bumpup today is still at a lower level than in many months. so, gold hasn't been that good of an investment. i felt very upbeat today. i was worried that we'd see a big market selloff because as you said, when we had 9/11, we remembered the days and weeks after that. it was a massive selloff, and people were terror
to save the victims of the bombings. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. at tyco integrated security, we consider ourselves business optihow?rs. by building custom security solutions that integrate video, access control, fire and intrusion protection. all backed up with world-class monitoring centers, thousands of qualified technicians, and a personal passion to help protect your business. when your business is optimized like that, there's no stopping you. we are tyco integrated security. and we are sharper. . >>> moments after the twin blast was horrific, with the bombs define zooined to do maximum damage, and there were incredible efforts to help the wounded. dr. sanjay going joins us live in boston. i know you've been there for a couple days. it does seem to be bordering on minister rack louse this only three people have died in this. sol was injuries were so appalling, we assumed the death toll would rise quite significantly. >> reporter: yeah, and i think those miracles come in the form of some good
intelligence before the boston event, that they affect the jobs markets, affects the overall economy in the last month? look, i'm sorry, i just don't buy it. i think it's reprehensible to politicize an event like this. >>gretchen: would be like on the other side if republicans said this maybe had happened because of president obama's foreign policy with regard to terrorism. that would also be outrageous. >> there are two sides to this fence. don't politicize an event like this. don't do it. that's opinion, okay. >>steve: stuart varney is going to have a lot to talk about over at fox business today, 9:20 eastern time where he takes control of that channel each and every week. all right, stewart. >>gretchen: coming up, boston has a message for the attacker. we'll show you how citizens are speaking out now. >>brian: a dad passes out behind the wheel, and his young kids spring into action. >> we're going 90. >>brian: the outcome? >>brian: the outcome? nothing short of a miracle. with its foot-activated lift gate. but that's not all you'll see, cause c-max also beats prius v, with better
of our economy. that's not what happens. there is no evidence whatsoever to demonstrate that workplace safety regulations by osha make any impact on a business's ability. i would argue that a facility like this that blows up, not only do you have the devastation of people who've been killed, you have now a lost numbers of jobs and you have a community that's completely devastated by this disaster. >> yeah. this is a perfect example of -- i don't -- i cover public life for a living. i don't think very often who's regulating huge warehouses of nitrates that are sitting there and could blow up. that's someone's job, right? someone is out there doing this. one place is the chemical safety board. they do post disaster investigations. they try to create recommendations. here's a statistic to give you a sense, celeste, about the squeezing there is on regulatory bodies more fully. those gray bars are recorded incidents, right, chemical workplace incidents and those orange bars are investigations. what you see is a gap opening up between the two. does that track with what you have seen, celeste
a billion dollars a day. it's a big economy. the ninth largest in the economy. on friday everything stopped. businesses closed. public transit shut down. 16 of the areas 35 colleges canceled classes. most taxis were off the road. shopping centers were shut. and, and people, you know, may have worked from home. maybe they took the day off. but others could have been busier. thousands of law enforcement officials, hospital workers, hotel employees, they've worked overtime. some dunkin' donuts franchises stayed open reportedly at the request of first responders. there are insurance claims businesses can file for terrorism related losses if it's covered under the policy. but it's going to be difficult for a lot of small businesses to get back all that revenue and meet payroll. so for some businesses, they are really feeling the pain of last week. for others, though, it was a very, very busy, busy week. it just depends on where you are in the spectrum of business in boston. >> terrorism related losses. >> that's right. >> remarkable, isn't it? what's the one thing we need to know about our money
is struggling. the u.s. economy seems to take two steps forward, one step back and i would also have to agree with your comments about the fed. lou, i also read that but i think that the fed cirman has made it perfectly clear that they were going to stay the course for the indefinite future. >> w what will ultimately drive prices will be the growth of wages and salaries and the like and according to the march -- lou: we would like to have some of that. >> we would like to see some growth there. in march the conference board's survey showed that the percent of consumers expecting a lower income six months from now, once again exceeded the percent expecting income growth. we never saw this type of imbalance in previous recoveries and that's a b unsettling. lou: i lied. you get the last word, lou. we started out with the gold, deflation. you get the last word. >> we're not far apart but i would say that the revenues of corporate america have been slowing. as the top line continues to slow, the abili to maintain profitability is certainly doubul and i think any wisp of deflatn or whiff of deflati
funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the investigation of the boston marathon bombings ramped up today, as police and federal agents pored over the crime scene. three people are dead, including an eight-year-old boy, and more than 170 others were injured. a handful of those remain in critical condition at various boston hospitals. newshour correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage of the day after. orter: the morning sun filtered across an empty boylston street today, littered with the remnants of yesterday's marathon and the double bombings that brought it all to an end. >> it kind of looks like a war zone. it's all cordo
of the economy beginning, of course, with the subprime crisis, so that really added fuel to the fire, made people angry, afraid, concerned, feeling like the country they lived in was not the country they grew up in, and so on. i think those are the two main things. the debate that began about gun control i think clearly has raised the temperature even more. sirchlts we just spent the last half hour talking about the fabric of american society being woven even tighter in times of tragedy, but can't forget about the fact that there are certain pockets about deep dissatisfaction. >> we're on two tracks in this country. if you go back to when i was a kid or a young man, we're in a much better place now racially than we were back then. on the other hand you have a proliferation of these groups. because of the changing demographics, and that sort of thing. one of the things i'm curious about, though, is why this does not get more coverage in the media. i think this is an important trend in the society, very significant, mark's group monitors this stuff heavily, but does not get a lot of traction in the
: you can come here and help us understand the economy for start starters. >> yeah, that would be fun. that would be fun. >> rose: thank you, congratulations. >> well thanks for having me on. >> rose: rick levin. 20 years, 1993 to 2013 as president of yale university came and yale was not in great shape, he leaves it in fantastic shape. thank you for joining us. see you next time. >> the following kqed production was browsed in high definition. >> it's all about licking your plate. >> i should be in psychoanalysis for the amount of money i spend in restaurants. >> i had a horrible experience. >> i don't even think we were at the same restaurant. >> you bet. leslie: hi, i'm leslie sbrocco, and welcome to check please bay area, the show where regular bay area residents just like you review and talk about their favorite restaurants. we have three guests, and each one recommends one of their favorite spots, and we send the other two to go check them out and see what they think. >>> this week, kris veldheer is a theological librarian with a penchant for mexican food, who stands in line fo
, every sector of the economy, every possible ethnic group. >> stahl: visitors will be able to search these interactive tables and call up profiles of each person, with photos and recorded remembrances by family members and friends like this one by the father of paul acquaviva, who died in tower 1. >> mr. acquaviva: he never had a bad word, literally, to say about anybody. he always looked at the positive. you know, i know, to be honest with you, he didn't get it from me because i'm very critical at times. to me, that was one of the most important things about paul. >> alice greenwald: some of them are funny. some of them are sweet. and we're not telling you who they are; their loved ones are telling you who they are. >> stahl: visitors can also search by birthplace or by company. >> alice greenwald: if i call up cantor... >> stahl: cantor fitzgerald was the company that lost more employees than any other. >> alice greenwald: 658 people... >> stahl: look at that. >> alice greenwald: ...who died on 9/11 at cantor fitzgerald. >> stahl: from that one company. one of the 658 was john kats
's the♪rush? (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >>> the surviving bombing suspect is charged with federal authorities in his hospital bed with fatal use of a weapon of mass destruction. joining us now is congressman dutch ruppersberger of meyaryla, the senior congressman of the house intelligence committee. thank you, congressman, i know you've been well briefed in what's going on. is it your sense right now that these two brothers, one of whom is now dead, were in fact linked to some sort of terrorist group? >> at this time, wolf, we have no indication. of course, that's one of the big issues. we have our intelligence committee right now, both internationally and internally, getting any information that we can to find out what the motive was for this terrible crime to occur. >> the boston police commissioner, ed davis, says that these two suspects may have been planning more attacks down the road. what can you tell us about that? >> i don't think we have any information to that effect other than they
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